25 – Barn Conversion – Week 20 – Part 1

| 1st December 2015 | 0 Comments

Week 20 –  30th November to – 4th of December

Part 1 – Mon & Tuesday

Barn Conversion

Monday

This is a great day….today the roofers arrive and we can finally start to close in the barn structure and take one step further to being water tight.

Also the Tanking to the side extension will commence. Nick Teasel of South East Timber Treatment is the contractor. He has been employed on a price.

The roofers I have employed are Old Town Roofing. They have been employed on a price to include labour, plant, tools and fixings. I will provide all materials ‘free issue’.

I carried out the induction to comply with CDM regulations and walked them around the site. We talked through the project and discussed any H and S issues regarding the site in general and the roofing itself.

As mentioned in the previous post the barn roof would be a warm roof as follows:

  • 12.5mm plasterboard fixed externally to the rafter so the oak structure is completely on view internally.
  • 11mm OSB sterling board fixed to rafters through plasterboard
  • 100mm Insulation would be fixed down with battens running the length of the rafters
  • Breathable membrane
  • Roofing batten at the required gauge
  • Nib tiles

I made sure that the roofers understood that each section of plasterboard would need to be secured flat to the rafter to prevent gaping. They soon worked out that the best way to achieve this was to lay the boards horizontally so the full length of the board could flex across any undulation from rafter to rafter. Boards were to be cut to the centre of rafters so only the horizontal joints were visible. These joints would be filled, rubbed back and then  painted. No skim plastering required. Any boards damaged during installation would need to be replaced.

They made a great start:

A short video showing blockwork being constructed, oak joints being repaired, roofers de-nailing and Andy sticking his tongue ou from Ian Jenkins on Vimeo.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - plasterboard being cut and fixed externally on oak structure

Plasterboard being cut and fixed to the external face of the oak structure

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - plasterboard fixed to rafters around reinforcement

Plasterboard cut around steel reinforcement

 

The roofers were asked to finish the boards flush at eaves level. Once the OSB is fixed Andy and Joe would install the Oak sprocket rafter feet extensions.

Here is a picture of Joe cutting the sprockets.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - oak sprockets being cut

Oak Sprockets being cut

 

Andy and Alex, after meeting and talking with the roofers to find out what they needed completed to enable their works, spent Monday boarding the gable ends of the barn so that the roofers had the correct build up to go to.

Andy Feaver is very very good at liaising not only with me regarding programme but also with other trades to ensure that work flows seamlessly. It is this sort of communication that makes a project managers life so much easier. On the Brenchley project he came up with many money saving and value adding ideas. I would encourage any one when employing contractors to find out from previous customers how good they were at this type of communication.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - plasterboard being cut and fixed externally on oak structure

Plasterboard being cut and fixed to the external face of the oak structure

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - plasterboard fixed to the external face of oak structure

Plasterboard fixed to the external face of oak structure

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - plasterboard fixed to the external face of oak structure

Plasterboard fixed to the external face of oak structure

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex -

Plasterboard fixed to the external face of oak structure

 

As mentioned at the beginning of the post the Tanking begins today. Nick Teasel of South East Timber Treatment is on site. His first task is to cut out the drainage channels.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - Tanking channel being prepared

Nick Teasel of South East Timber Treatment breaking out slab in side extensions for tanking drainage channel

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - Tanking channel being prepared

Nick Teasel of South East Timber Treatment breaking out slab in side extensions for tanking drainage channel

 

Tuesday

Today is more of the same. The roofers continue with the plasterboard / OSB fixing to the roof; I asked that they initially lay some boards on the new rafters to the SE Elevation over the out-shuts so that Andy and Joe could fix the sprockets/rafter feet extensions after which Dan would build up the brickwork between the rafter feet.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - osb fixed onto plasterboard over rafters

OSB fixed through plasterboard to external face of SE Elevation out-shuts

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - osb fixed onto plasterboard over rafters

OSB fixed through plasterboard to external face of SE Elevation out-shuts

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - rafter feet extension / sprocket

Sprocket / rafter feet extension fixed on top of osb/plasterboard

 

After they had completed this section they jumped back onto the main barn to complete the work to the NW pitch.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - OSB fixed through plasterboard to external face of the oak structure

Tony and Danny from Old Town Roofing fixing OSB through plasterboard to external face of the oak structure

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - OSB fixed through plasterboard to external face of the oak structure

OSB fixed through plasterboard to external face of the oak structure

 

Andy and Joe fixed plasterboard and OSB to the cheeks either aside of the bi-folding doors to establish the build up which the roofers will go to.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - Plasterboard and osb fixed to cheeks

Plasterboard and osb fixed to cheeks

 

Nick Teasel from South East Timber Treatment was getting on well with the tanking in the side elevation.

He had cut the drainage channel and was fixing the membrane to the walls using plugs; these plugs will be used to fix the stud walls through which services will be run.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex -Tanking drainage channels

Tanking drainage channels

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - tanking membrane being fixed to brick wall

Tanking membrane being fixed with plugs to the brick wall

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - tanking membrane being fixed to brick wall

Tanking membrane being fixed with plugs to the brick wall

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex -Tanking plugs used to secure membrane to brick wall

Tanking plugs used to secure membrane to brick wall

Danny has built up the brickwork and fixed the new plate the SE Elevation of the side extension. He will now continue to build up the brickwork between the rafters of the out-shuts.

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - oak plate fixed to the top of the new brickwork to the side extension

oak plate fixed to the top of the new brickwork to the side extension

 

The oak structure is looking fabulous now the plasterboard is providing a backdrop. I can only imagine how good they will look one the plasterboard has been painted an off white and the warm lighting washes across the beams:

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - oak frame on display

The repaired oak frame looks great against the plasterboard

 

Maddomswood Historic Oak Barn Conversion East Sussex - oak frame on display

The west gable that was completely re-built – looks great

 

Category: Construction Phase, Maddomswood Barn, My Projects, Property Developing

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